Teachers Collaborate to Teach Students French Culture

Bri+Stephenson%2C+senior%2C+and+Sophia+Vetter-Ryan%2C+sophomore%2C+work+to+prepare+bacon+for+a+French+quiche+recipe.++Students+from+French+and+Foods+and+Nutrition+joined+forces+to+learn+how+to+prepare+authentic+French+dishes+in+honor+of+Mardi+Gras.++
Back to Article
Back to Article

Teachers Collaborate to Teach Students French Culture

Bri Stephenson, senior, and Sophia Vetter-Ryan, sophomore, work to prepare bacon for a French quiche recipe.  Students from French and Foods and Nutrition joined forces to learn how to prepare authentic French dishes in honor of Mardi Gras.

Bri Stephenson, senior, and Sophia Vetter-Ryan, sophomore, work to prepare bacon for a French quiche recipe. Students from French and Foods and Nutrition joined forces to learn how to prepare authentic French dishes in honor of Mardi Gras.

Rachel Litvin

Bri Stephenson, senior, and Sophia Vetter-Ryan, sophomore, work to prepare bacon for a French quiche recipe. Students from French and Foods and Nutrition joined forces to learn how to prepare authentic French dishes in honor of Mardi Gras.

Rachel Litvin

Rachel Litvin

Bri Stephenson, senior, and Sophia Vetter-Ryan, sophomore, work to prepare bacon for a French quiche recipe. Students from French and Foods and Nutrition joined forces to learn how to prepare authentic French dishes in honor of Mardi Gras.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The week of Mardi Gras isn’t all about what many see on TV, such as partying and many parades. There’s much more to this celebration, and food is an essential part of it. Mrs. Kristy Collins, Family and Consumer Science Teacher, and Mrs. Julia Marshall, French teacher, collaborated together to start a unit on how to make French food in honor of Mardi Gras.

The idea of this lesson started when Marshall could no longer take her students to a French restaurant. “I used to do a restaurant trips. Now there are no longer any reasonable ones near, but I still wanted students to eat and try French food,” said Marshall.  This collaboration is a hands on lesson and gets the students out of their normal learning space into the kitchen for a week to experience French culture firsthand. With guidance from students in Foods, French students learned culinary skills such as how to cut bacon and onions, use an oven and fryer, also how to measure out ingredients properly. 

The change of pace out of classroom and trying different things is nice. I loved getting to see the students in the kitchen, and also seeing some students cook for the first time.”

— Julie Marshall, French Teacher

Over the course of the unit, students cooked several dishes with their groups. During this unit, the students made crepes, quiche, and beignets. Marshall said “they are classic French dishes, and we are able to make them in the class time that we have.” Also for Mardi Gras, the Culinary Class made King Cake for the students to enjoy. King Cake is a traditional dessert because it was first served on King’s Day and represents the coming of the three wise men.

Many French students had a hard time preparing the dishes. “The quiche was the hardest dish to make because it was a new dish,” said freshman Madison Calihan. She explained that it was difficult because there were many tasks needed to be done and not enough time. Also, not knowing the way around the kitchen made it difficult for the French students.

Getting out of the classroom and working with a different class was a change of pace to the French students. After spending a month of learning about french foods, getting to make the food themselves helped make class interesting.