The Cardinal Spirit

The Cardinal Spirit

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Seniors Self-Diagnose Themselves With Senioritis

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Seniors Self-Diagnose Themselves With Senioritis

Chase Hayes and Emme Palmer were voted to have the biggest case of senioritis by their classmates this year.

Chase Hayes and Emme Palmer were voted to have the biggest case of senioritis by their classmates this year.

Sophie Kindel

Chase Hayes and Emme Palmer were voted to have the biggest case of senioritis by their classmates this year.

Sophie Kindel

Sophie Kindel

Chase Hayes and Emme Palmer were voted to have the biggest case of senioritis by their classmates this year.

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For weeks, I have struggled with starting this piece…probably because I have come down with a minor case of senioritis.  I don’t want to do anything. It is very hard for me to get out of bed in the mornings to come to school, and I have a hard time getting started on work.   Basically my motivation for anything school related is lacking.

The end of the year is coming up fast, and I am about to graduate–well, hopefully.  Therefore, I need to cure this senioritis NOW! The good news, if there is any, is that I know I am not the only one struggling with senioritis. Senior Kayla Tharp has also fallen victim to senioritis.  She is experiencing one of the same symptoms as me–lack of motivation. “I constantly dread coming to school, and everyday I think to myself ‘Wow I can’t wait to get [high school] over with!’”

Senior Ellie Lockwood also admits to experiencing senioritis.  She said, “The hardest thing about being a senior is once you’re committed to a college, you just want give up and to be in college.”  I agree with her. After I committed to my college in October, I didn’t want to do my high school work; I wanted to be on campus and be a college student.

It’s not uncommon, however, for some seniors to struggle with senioritis throughout the entire year. Emme Palmer said her senioritis started “right at the beginning of senior year, and has gotten worse as the year progresses.”  She was even voted to have the “Worst Case of Senioritis” by fellow members of her senior class.

Emme’s symptoms include sleeping spells during class, showing up right as the bell rings, and sweatpants fever.  While she has given into the symptoms of senioritis day after day, she admits that her battle with this does come with consequences.  Emme has experienced a “slight drop in grades, and is stressed more, especially about college.”

Courtney Keller, an English teacher, is teaching senior English for the first time this year and she has also noticed a difference between underclassmen and seniors.  Some of her senior students ask her how many points an assignment is worth before even starting it. “They want to know if they HAVE to do the assignment to pass,” she explained.  

Kaytlyn Gray said her senioritis didn’t start until after Christmas Break, but she is not spending a lot of time worrying about how to end it.  “I’ve gotten this far, so it will all work out,” she said. However, for students that are searching for a way to end senioritis, there are some tricks I use that may help others to squash it.

The first step to curing your senioritis is setting goals you know you can achieve.  Start keeping a planner to get yourself back on a good schedule, or keep a checklist to see what you have to accomplish.  Once the list is complete, reward yourself. A way I reward myself is hanging out with friends or watching a couple episodes of my favorite show.  I also take small “snack breaks” after I check an assignment off of my list.

Although there is no documented cure for senioritis, there are many things that you can do to help yourself.  All you need is a little bit of motivation to start and it will take off from there. Hopefully. We all want to make it across the stage at graduation.  

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