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What’s the Latest Lingo? Are You In the Know?

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What’s the Latest Lingo? Are You In the Know?

Senior Adri Portman helps educate English teacher Annette Manlief on the latest phrases used in casual conversations. 
 Manlief jotted down several phrases and planned to start using them when she spoke with students.

Senior Adri Portman helps educate English teacher Annette Manlief on the latest phrases used in casual conversations. Manlief jotted down several phrases and planned to start using them when she spoke with students.

Heather Dant

Senior Adri Portman helps educate English teacher Annette Manlief on the latest phrases used in casual conversations. Manlief jotted down several phrases and planned to start using them when she spoke with students.

Heather Dant

Heather Dant

Senior Adri Portman helps educate English teacher Annette Manlief on the latest phrases used in casual conversations. Manlief jotted down several phrases and planned to start using them when she spoke with students.

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Students use a lot of lingo.  They have different words for awesome, drama, tired, and many more.  When students talk to each other, many times staff members have no idea what they are saying.  Yes, it’s true that teachers had their own lingo as teenagers, but language always evolves over time. So, exactly how aware are members of the Scott County High School staff of this new lingo?  Several staff agreed to take part in a test to find out.

Vickey Ritchey, the attendance clerk for SCHS, was happy to be quizzed on students’ lingo. She was asked what she thinks “No Cap” means, and she was not provided with an example of how it was being used by students. Mrs. Ritchey’s first thought was that “No cap” meant  “If you don’t have a cap on your drink, it is going to spill.” Unfortunately, she was not correct. So, we went in search of another teacher to test their knowledge of this phrase.

Kim Smith, a special education teacher, had a different opinion about the meaning.  Smith believed that it meant, “No limits.” Well, that isn’t exactly correct; no cap means that they’re not lying.  For example, one may hear students use this phrase in this way, “I have the worst case of senioritis, no cap.”

The next teacher to take our test was Kenya Duhamel, a social studies teacher.  Her assigned phrase was “Let’s get this bread.”  She said, “I think it means money,” and she was very excited to know that she got the first one correct.  Students would use this expression to discuss their jobs. For example, when a student is going to work, they may be heard saying “Let’s go get this bread.”  

Since Mrs. Duhamel got her first phrase correct, we decided to test her knowledge even further.  The second phrase she was assigned was “Weird flex, but okay.”  She said, “So, I’m guessing that flex refers to body movement, and it’s okay?”  Well, good try Mrs. Duhamel, but you still has some learning to do. Weird flex, but okay means that’s a strange thing to brag about, but you do you.  

All of this lingo talk made Mrs. Duhamel think of a phrase she had heard students using in conversations, and she wanted to make sure she was on track.  She asked “Okay, is a snack someone who is really cute?” When told that was correct, she said she had heard students say it and had to be sure “it wasn’t cannibalism.”  The last word she was tested on was “Boolin.” She got it correct when she answered that it meant, “You’re hanging out with someone.”

Serving Looks” was the first phrase for Pam Hall, a regular sub at SCHS.  Her idea was, “He’s, like, looking at you, so he’s serving you looks.”  Well Mrs. Hall, that’s not right… Serving looks is when someone’s whole outfit, hair, makeup, etc. is on point.  Mrs. Hall was tested again on the word “Clout.”  Without being given any context she said, “You’re status is above someone else.”  Which, if you think about it, she was correct. Clout means you are famous/popular and have an influence.  For example, Snoop Dogg has clout.

The final phrase for Mrs. Hall was “the tea.” She simply replied, “A drink?”  Yes, it’s true that tea is a drink.  But, these days when it is used by teens, it is also referring to gossip or personal information about someone else.  This phrase came from people who would drink tea and gossip. A student might say they have the tea about a rumor.

Annette Manlief, an English teacher, was the last teacher to be tested and her first phrase was “Bag Secured.”  When asked what she thought it meant, she replied “that your purse is okay.”  Although it is nice to know your purse is safe, it actually means you have been on your grind, making money.  Bag Secured is similar to Let’s get this bread.

The next phrase is “Serving Looks.”  Mrs. Manlief was very sure of her answer, “That means you’re about to fight!”  While Mrs. Manlief was quite confident, she was also incorrect. According to the teen lingo of today, it means you are looking good.  Since she got this one incorrect, we went to the next phrase, “What’s the move?”  Mrs. Manlief believed it meant it was a “signature way to impress the ladies and gents.”  Yeah… That wasn’t very correct. If a teen is asking “What’s the move?” they are trying to determine plans for the day.

Mrs. Manlief was so excited about the new lingo, she went home and recorded herself quizzing her husband and daughter about what she had learned in class.  Senior, Ellie Lockwood said Mrs. Manlief showed her 3rd hour class the video the next day. Ellie said everyone loved the video and they were shocked her husband got some correct.  “It was also funny to listen to her daughter’s responses and how literal they were.”

All in all, it could be said that the staff at SCHS might not know exactly what students are saying, but they know enough.  Staff use context clues to determine what is being talked about in front of them. Until the lingo evolves again and leaves teacher in the dark, be careful what you say because you never know if they understand or not.  

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